Gargoyles in Vicenza

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(Monsters for Illustration Friday… the last one too?)

In architecture, a gargoyle is a carved stone grotesque with a spout designed to convey water from a roof and away from the side of a building.

The term originates from the French gargouille, originally “throat” or “gullet”;[1] cf. Latin gurgulio, gula, and similar words derived from the root gar, “to swallow”, which represented the gurgling sound of water (e.g., Spanish garganta, “throat”; Spanish g├írgola, “gargoyle”).

A chimera, or a grotesque figure, is a sculpture that does not work as a waterspout and serves only an ornamental or artistic function. These are also usually called gargoyles in laypersons’ terminology,[1] although the field of architecture usually preserves the distinction between gargoyles (functional waterspouts) and non-waterspout grotesques.

more at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gargoyle

Basilica Palladiana (Vicenza – Italy)

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The Basilica Palladiana is a Renaissance building in the central Piazza dei Signori in Vicenza, north-eastern Italy. The most notable feature of the edifice is the loggia, which shows one of the first examples of the what came to be known as the Palladian window, designed by a young Andrea Palladio, whose work in architecture was to have a significant effect on the field during the Renaissance and later periods.
more at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basilica_Palladiana